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Thursday, July 19, 2012 09:22 am

Letters to the Editor 07/19/12

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For the history of horseshoes and the original recipe, see “What happened to horseshoes? The history of Springfield’s iconic food shows the original was nothing like today’s version,” by Julianne Glatz, Feb. 2, at illinoistimes.com.
PHOTO BY PATRICK YEAGLE

HORSESHOE FAN
I grew up outside of Springfield and loved Norb Andy’s horseshoes. Is the receipe you have from Feb. 2, 2012, the real original Leland Hotel horseshoe sauce? [Yes. –Ed.] There are several on the Internet claiming they are it and they are very similar. We are coming back to Illinois in two weeks and we are hitting Norb Andy’s now that it is open again. It was a staple in my husband’s life. His dad worked at the Capitol back in the day and they were there all the time. We live in Florida now and so many people love my horseshoes! I’ve tried to duplicate Norb’s for many years.

Chris Elmer


ASPHALTIFICATION

If the Mid-Illinois Medical District needs more parking spaces, let them build another parking garage. How many more historic houses and trees will they tear down? A new parking lot is going up between First and Second off of Calhoun. I thought at first that yay, someone had the wherewithal to at least save the beautiful trees around the periphery of the soon-to-be parking lot. But they have been razed as well. When will Springfield realize that our historic heritage is what will keep this town alive and thriving? Who gave Memorial Medical Center the OK to take these trees down? If it affects the community we should have a say in it.

Seth Koerner
Springfield



STANDING BY
A state’s attorney who vows to stand behind a conviction after the conviction has been called into question by a higher court ignores his oath to support the constitution and a core constitutional value, the right that no citizen should be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law. An elected state’s attorney takes an oath to support the constitution. Yet when evidence comes forth which could exonerate a citizen wrongfully convicted, this oath and our constitutional values of due process are ignored when a prosecutor “stands by the conviction.”

Pam Jacobazzi, a former daycare provider, was sentenced to 32 years in prison for the death of Matthew Czapski, a child in her daycare [see “Falsely accused mothers: Reopen shaken baby case,” by Neil Schneider, June 28]. Prosecutors said the infant died of shaken baby syndrome. But scientific advances now question whether shaken baby syndrome caused the death. An appellate court also questioned whether shaken baby syndrome was the cause of death and ordered a hearing for November to determine whether questions surrounding shaken baby syndrome warrant a new trial.

While Matthew’s death is tragic, so too is the statement of the DuPage County state’s attorney who “stands by the conviction and the jury’s finding of guilt.” Sadly, wrongful convictions are not an unfamiliar story. Our constitutional values are ignored when a prosecutor fails to afford due process of law which, in my judgment, means a fair-minded, unbiased prosecutor willing to seek the truth.

Ron Stradt
Springfield



GRIFFIN OLD GROWTH?
No one has performed due diligence in researching this property [see “The twenty acre wood,” by James Krohe Jr., July 12]. The majority of the population of Springfield has no idea what is in those woods, and apparently no one in city government has bothered to find out before making a decision about it.

There are old-growth trees in Griffin Woods which should be untouchable under any circumstances. My husband and I did an amateur sampling and dating of the large trees we were able to easily find. Of 17 trees, the average age was, very conservatively calculated using two methodologies, 229 years.

The maximum age obtained under either method of calculation was an astonishing 368 years.

From illinoistimes.com

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