Home / Articles / Commentary / Letters to the Editor / Letters to the Editor 02/25/16
Print this Article
Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016 12:19 am

Letters to the Editor 02/25/16

The late Julianne Glatz with her husband, Peter, who contributes another food column this week.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GLATZ FAMILY

 

A PLEASANT SURPRISE
Each week when I pick up the newest edition of Illinois Times, I turn back to read Julianne Glatz’s food column. A week ago, I turned back, expecting to find the feature article immediately followed by the entertainment/events articles. But I was pleasantly surprised to instead find a beautiful remembrance of Julianne written by her husband, Peter. (“The last waltz,” Feb. 18.)

Thank you, Peter. Condolences to Mr. Glatz and his family.

Alvera Knox
Springfield



SERIOUS COOKING
Add my name to the list of those paying tribute to food writer Julianne Glatz. While I don’t devote as much time as I would like to serious cooking, it is one of my favorite pastimes.  Julianne took the time, and wrote about it so well. Each week I eagerly looked forward to her column and learned so much, from the virtues of tomato jam to the proper pronunciation of bruschetta.

In honor of her, I am dedicating this entire weekend to serious cooking. Rest in peace, Mrs. Glatz. You will be missed.

Carol Mullen
Springfield


WHAT USE IS 211?
I was surprised to see that United Way has had a 211 number for people in need of help or information since the middle of 2012. I am sure there are others in the community also unaware of this number. This is a 24-hour number, usually used by people in need of help with housing, shelter, food or utility assistance. However, it is also used as a resource line in time of a community-wide crisis such as a tornado or other disaster freeing up 911 for the emergency calls for police, fire or ambulatory services.

This number needs to become as familiar to the community as 911 has become.

Tyre W. Rees
Springfield



APPLE REFUSES
No one approves of government overreach, but you wanted a phone to carry around. Check. You wanted to bank without entering a bank. Check. You wanted to communicate without writing letters, or, as it turns out, calling. Check. Make it take pictures, show movies, play music, do your math, remind you of appointments, play games, identify stars in the night sky, ad infinitum. Well, now your life is in your pocket. How is it?

Before computers and smartphones, none of this was immune from search and seizure should you be implicated in a crime. Now a corporation (which are “people” too, thanks to Citizen United) will not assist the FBI in identifying terrorist plots. Why? Because someone sitting in their underwear nearly anywhere in the world could use whatever the corporation comes up with to cruelly dismantle people’s lives. We are now at the mercy of people who never go anywhere or do anything or accept one iota of responsibility.

I am no fan of new information technologies but am not so repressed that I couldn’t raise my child to become a world-class scientist and thoroughly modern human. Oppenheimer did his nuclear tricks because he had to follow the data. The day of the Trinity test he was terrified and sickened because he had no way to know what he had wrought without continuing.

As you continue to compress your life into your pocket, all I ask is to be careful what you wish for and try to have a life.

Sue Anderson
Springfield

Log in to use your Facebook account with
IllinoisTimes

Login With Facebook Account



Recent Activity on IllinoisTimes

Calendar

  • Thu
    19
  • Fri
    20
  • Sat
    21
  • Sun
    22
  • Mon
    23
  • Tue
    24
  • Wed
    25
   

SPRINGFIELD EVENTS

PUB CRAWL